Attending the “Law School of the North”

Anyone who has lived in Northwestern Ontario will understand the uniqueness of the environment and demography here in comparison to the rest of the province, let alone the country. Growing up in Kenora, I have been exposed to many of the diverse issues faced by the population here and attending a law school that emphasized a focus on many of these issues seemed to make the most sense.

Attending a law school that catered to the unique characteristics and needs of Northwestern Ontario was important to me. Growing up in this region, it was always evident that there was an array of distinct issues; however, it became even clearer during my time away from Northern Ontario. It was then that I realized just how unique the area was in terms of its issues, population and environment – and this is what drove me to choose the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law for my legal education.

This law school has three specific mandates: Aboriginal and Indigenous law, Natural Resource and Environmental law and Small Practice. It is a law school that is committed to not only bringing more lawyers to the North but also to inspiring them to lead the way in providing the best access to justice possible to these rural and remote communities. As a law student from Northwestern Ontario, I could not be happier with this unique, specific yet diverse legal education.

The curriculum is catered to Northwestern Ontario, by not only offering a mandatory full year Aboriginal Law course but also by incorporating Anishinaabe and Métis legal teachings – through both a first year mandatory course, and a requirement in which students have the opportunity to participate in Indigenous events and traditions. This focus is one that is unique to this law school, and being given the opportunity to learn not only how the current legal system is affecting the Indigenous population, but to also learn Indigenous legal teachings themselves.

Finally, the unique curriculum effectively prepares students for practice in small, rural communities by integrating practical assignments into each course and by incorporating a four-month practice placement at the end of the degree; allowing us students the opportunity to understand the distinct challenges and realities of small town practice in Northern Ontario, from the earliest point possible.

I could not be happier with my decision to pursue my law degree in Northern Ontario, it is a unique law school, that is catered to the environment and the demographic of the North and it provides an exclusive perspective that will shape how I advocate in this area for years to come.

Employment Opportunity – Solicitor

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Hook, Seller and Lundin LLP is looking to add to their team! Ever dream of living at the lake and being able to practice in the same location? Located only 2 hours from Winnipeg on the shores of Lake of the Woods, Kenora is the ideal location to balance these goals, and have a thriving legal career at the same time.  We are looking for a lawyer, preferably with a minimum of 5 years of experience in corporate, commercial and real estate matters to join our busy firm.  Please reply to Cheryl Siran at csiran@hsllaw.ca, via fax at 807-468-8384 or drop off a C.V. at reception!

 

Kim Riediger (Mejia) joins Lake of the Woods District Hospital Foundation

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HSL Associate, Kim Riediger( Mejia), has joined the Board of Directors of the Lake of the Woods District Hospital Foundation.

The LWDHF was established in 1992 and is dedicated to raising funds for new medical equipment and capital infrastructure upgrades for the Lake of the Woods District Hospital.

Kim looks forward to assisting the LWDHF in doing all they can to assist the hospital in providing the necessary tools to ensure patients and the community continue to receive the best quality medical care close to home.